Pastor’s Corner June 10, 2018

The Third Place

If one member suffers, all suffer together with it; if one member is honored, all rejoice together with it. — 1 Corinthians 12:26 NRSV

 

The Pacific Northwest Annual Conference published an article written by Kristina Gonzalez, Director of Leadership Development for an Inclusive Church for the PNW Conference. The article, titled What Can Methodists Learn From Starbucks?[1] discusses the approach the corporation Starbucks has taken to systemwide unconscious bias and racism. The company took a day-long pause on May 29 for a systemwide training and reflection time in response to an incident in a Philadelphia store earlier this spring when a store manager summoned law enforcement to confront two Black men simply waiting for a friend to arrive. Starbucks apologized to the men, and the manager was fired.

 

This came in the middle of many public dismissals: perpetrators of sexual harassment or assault in the workplace immediately fired without question, public social media rants becoming grounds for immediate cancellation and dismissal, and many more cases of strict and swift (thankfully!) consequences. For myself, I see this as relief in the midst of severe leniency and ignorance from the past decades. Gonzalez writes about the absence of systemic responses to issues that allow discrimination or abuse to go unchecked. Starbucks, though may not be everyone’s favorite coffee shop, has taken significant and unpopular steps to address bias systemwide.

 

Starbucks was founded on the principle of Third Place: a gathering place outside of home and work. It is to be a place of relaxation, interaction, meeting, debating, reading, enjoying coffee and tea in community. The training, along with reflecting on bias in our society, staff dreamt about how to create public spaces where everyone feels like they belong. Then, Starbucks made their training materials public, providing model ideas for others.

 

Check them out here: https://starbuckschannel.com/thethirdplace/

 

What are your Third Places? Is the church one of your places? Where are our embedded biases? Gonzalez points out the reality that the people called Methodists have had countless moments in our history similar to Starbucks’ moment. How did we respond? Often, it has been to split or segregate. What if we didn’t? What if we did something different? What if we reflected on our biases and then dreamt of how to create space of Third Places…where everyone feels like they belong–because they do?

 

Peace,

 

Pastor Sami

[1] http://www.pnwumc.org/news/what-can-methodists-learn-from-starbucks/