Pastor’s Corner April 8, 2018

HOLDING HISTORY
Seven years ago, I was a leader for two youth mission trips in southeast Tennessee and southern North Carolina. While cleaning out a garage, we discovered almost 20 years’ worth of LIFE Magazine issues in mint condition. We carefully spread out all the magazines and arranged them chronologically, beginning in the late 50s all through the mid 70s. The issues covered our workspace with history. One of the other adult leaders was a history teacher, and the youth gathered around her as we flipped through history in a way none of us had experienced. Getting to hold issues sharing pictures of walking on the moon and the Vietnam War and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination brought a new understanding and respect to my life. I also became intrigued by the fact that we were in the backyard of this history: smack dab in the middle of the Jim Crow South. That was something I had not spent much time thinking about before. What were the thoughts of the owners while reading these issues? How did this town react?
As we remember Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination fifty years ago in Memphis, Tennessee, I can’t help but remember this trip I had. What effects did King’s presence and voice have on the black population in Tennessee? What effect did it have on Montana in 1968? All these questions are important to ponder. King was in Memphis to protest and march for sanitation workers’ conditions and low wages. After his death, riots broke out all across the country. It is still the story of our country today. Many have fought, but our work is not done. Both of these mission trips I experienced that summer were helping families living without plumbing in their homes. Generational poverty, inhumane working conditions, and discrimination plague our country still today, and much of King’s fight is still being fought. What will our future generations find in our garages? What stories of hope, fighting for justice, and equality will we share? How will we hold history in fifty years? Will it be still be our story? Or will it be an injustice eradicated?

Peace,
Pastor Sami