Pastor’s Corner July 22, 2018

Virtues of Patience

“The Fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.” Galatians 5:22

For the first time I planted a vegetable garden this year. It’s been an experience. To begin with, I was grateful for the raised bed and good soil. I enjoyed the process of going to the nursery and choosing what I wanted to grow. It was satisfying planting the pepper, tomato, and zucchini plants. I’ve been watering the garden and watching it. I was surprised, after being away for a week, how big all the plants and the weeds (!) had gotten. However, there are still no veggies to eat. I expected to have peppers and tomatoes and zucchini by now. Instead, I water, weed, and watch, and wait.

Waiting is hard. As we have access to most everything at our fingertips on our phones, waiting is not a virtue we practice much. Patience seems counter-cultural in our increasingly speedy society. The dictionary defines patience as the capacity to accept or tolerate delay, trouble, or suffering without getting angry or upset. That makes it sound very hard; acceptance, tolerance, no anger. Opportunities to exercise patience come in many forms; from little things like road construction to more significant things like waiting for healing after a surgery. The virtue of patience is challenging.

In my devotion this week the author writes, “though patience may appear passive, it is actually a form of concentrated strength. Patience needs to respect the reality of process.” Things take time. Sometimes we just need to sit back and wait. Which requires concentrated strength. I appreciate the reminder that patience isn’t passive, it’s an active discipline. Actively exercising faith and actively trusting the process.

Psalm 40:1-3 says

“I waited patiently for the Lord;

He turned to me and heard my cry.

He lifted me out of the slimy pit, and out of the mud and mire;

He set my feet on a rock and gave me a firm place to stand.”

As I read that again, I saw it in a new way. In between waiting patiently and standing on a firm place, the poet was in the slimy pit. Patience is not a pretty process. Usually there is mud and mire involved. If you are in a slimy pit right now, hold on to hope. Trust in the process. Exercise that concentrated strength. And most of all, rely on the Holy Spirit. For Paul reminds us that patience is a fruit of the Spirit. The Holy Spirit gives us strength more than we can muster in our own power. One day you will be standing on a solid rock again. A little more patience and I will be eating my garden vegetables!

 

Walking on the path of grace,

Pastor Patti


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