Pastor’s Corner June 17, 2018

On this Father’s Day, I think back to when I was eleven and I was asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. Though I had no idea what profession in which I would end up, I always knew that I wanted to be a father. I have been sure of this fact since I was three years old and playing house with my sister. I used to pretend to change diapers and play with her dolls much more than she played with my G.I. Joes or Transformers. It made me feel accomplished to be a caregiver.

That continues today. I have been blessed with a wonderful marriage that bore two fantastic children. Turner, my oldest, is a sensitive and sweet boy that makes me proud every day of his emotional intelligence and positive demeanor. He cares so deeply for others and tries to do his best always. Nia, my five-year-old daughter, is brilliantly feisty and powerful. She can look you in the eye and tell you “no” with certainty in her position or cuddle for an hour during family movie nights. She is sweet and strong and carries a confidence about her that makes me a bit jealous.

They both bring such an immense amount of joy to my life it is hard to put into words. I watch them as they sleep and cover them with a blanket when they are cold and my heart fills with life. We tell terrible jokes around the dinner table and I marvel at how their laughs sound just like mine. We sing songs in the car and I look at them in disbelief, (mostly because they know all the words but can’t remember to feed the dog). I pick them up from school and relish the moment when I take them into my arms and squeeze them. We wrestle and I tickle them until they squeal.

I know this does not last forever, and when times get tough, I tell myself about the wonderful things that I get to experience with them every day. Turner will be in fourth grade next year and he is already leaps and bounds smarter and more precocious than I was as a child. Nia will be in kindergarten and she already knows her numbers, letters and can write several words.

I am so proud to be their dad. I try not to cling too tightly to their childhood and make sure they have the room to grow and become the man and woman they were meant to be. But it is hard. I know these moments are fleeting. Yesterday, I was changing diapers and cleaning bottles. Tomorrow, I will be going to graduations and paying for college. And before you know it, I will be Grandpa Hank.

The best I can do is continue to be the consistent force in their life that teaches love and compassion, grit and toughness, and confidence in what they are and who they are. Because being the father of these two children in partnership with my wife is exactly what I wanted to be when I grew up.

Happy Father’s Day
Matt Hankins